English Grammar: Verb Times

Education LobsterNipples August 7, 2016 0 1
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In English you have different verb tenses and sentence building at different times. Here they are all treated. Also examples given of any time from both ordinary as negative and interrogative sentences.

Present Simple

This is the normal present tense. The 3rd person singular -s comes after the verb. For the verb "to have", "to go" and "to be" there are separate forms for the 3rd person singular. See the tables below.
  • VB1 I listen to music. I am listening to music.
  • VB2 You walk to school. Do you walk to school.
  • VB3 We laugh. We laugh.
  • VB4 She likes that. They find that fun.

  • In the denial, add the word "do not" to the sentence. Insert "do not" after the verb and you've got a negative. The 3rd person singular is it doesnâ. See VB 4. "Does not" is always followed by a whole verb.
  • VB1 I do not listen to music. I do not listen to music.
  • VB2 You do not walk to school. You're not going to school.
  • VB3 We do not laugh. We do not laugh.
  • VB4 She does not like that. She does not like that.

  • At interrogative sentences start with a form of the verb "to do" followed by the subject of the sentence and the rest of the sentence.
  • VB1 Do I listen to music? I listen to music?
  • VB2 Do you walk to school? Do you walk to school?
  • VB3 Do we laugh? We laugh?
  • VB3 Does she like that? Does she like that?

  • Present continuous

    You use the present continuous when something is currently underway. You make the present continuous with a form of the verb "to be" stuck followed by a verb with -ing to the stem.
  • VB1 I am listening to music. I'm listening to music.
  • VB2 You are walking to school. You're at school walking.
  • VB3 We are laughing. We laugh.
  • VB4 She is eating a banana. She is a banana eating.

  • To make the negative sentence, add the word "not" to the sentence. Is not + => is not. Are + not => are not.
  • VB1 I am not listening to music. I'm not listening to music.
  • VB2 You are not walking to school. You're not going to school to walking.
  • VB3 We are not laughing. We are not laughing.
  • VB4 She is not eating a banana. She is not a banana eating.

  • To make sense asking you set up a form of the verb "to be" at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the subject and the rest of the sentence.
  • VB1 Am I listening to music? I'm listening to music?
  • VB2 Are you walking to school? Are you at school to walking?
  • VB3 Are we laughing? Are we laughing?
  • VB4 Is she eating a bananan? Is it a banana eating?

  • Present perfect

    You use the present perfect in sentences with a past, where it does not matter if something happened. There is no time stipulation in the sentence. To make a perfect present, use a form of the verb "to have" + past participle. The regular verbs you can find the past participle by taking the stem of the verb and -ed to stick behind. At the bottom of this article has added a list of irregular verbs. You also use the present perfect after the words "for" and "since".
  • VB1 I've listened to music. I listened to music.
  • VB2 You have walked to school. You're walking to school.
  • VB3 We have laughed. We have laughed.
  • VB4 She has eaten a banana. She has eaten a banana.

  • To make the negative sentence, add the word "not" to the sentence. + Have not => have not. + Has not => has not.
  • VB1 I have not listened to music. I did not listen to music.
  • VB2 You have not walked to school. You're not walking to school.
  • VB3 We have not laughed. We did not laugh.
  • VB4 She hasnt eaten a banana. She has not eaten a banana.

  • To make the interrogative sentence, you put the form of "to have" in front, followed by the subject and the rest of the sentence.
  • VB1 Have I listened to music? I listened to music?
  • VB2 Have you heard it? have you heard?
  • VB3 Have we laughed? Do we laugh?
  • VB4 Has she eaten a banana? Do they eat a banana?

  • As mentioned above, use the present perfect even with the words "for" and "since".
  • VB1 I have lived here for three years. I lived here for three years.
  • VB2 I have not eaten a banana for three years. I've been three years no more banana eaten.
  • VB3 Have you lived there for three years? Have you lived there for three years?
  • VB1 I have lived here since WW II. I've lived here since the 2nd World War.
  • VB2 I have not been there since I moved to France. I have not been there since I moved to France.
  • VB3 Have you been to the supermarket since last week? Have you been to the grocery store last week?

  • Past Simple

    You use the simple fits in sentences with a past in which it is important when something happened. There is thus quite a timing in the sentence. To make a simple fits replace the verb by the simple fits-form of a verb. Irregular verbs have fits their own simple form of regular verbs you can make the simple fits-shape by -ed after pasting the tribe.
  • VB1 I listened to music last night. Last night I listened to music.
  • VB2 You walked to school last week. You're the last week walked to school.
  • VB3 We lauged yesterday. We laughed yesterday.
  • VB4 She ate a banana a few hours ago. a few minutes ago, she ate a banana.

  • To make the negative sentence, add the word "did not" to the sentence. First the subject, and did not then the rest of the sentence. Note: After did / did not always follow the infinitive WITHOUT past-time output.
  • VB1 I did not listen to music last night. Gisteravind I have not listened to music.
  • VB2 You did not walk to school last week. Last week, are not you gone to school.
  • VB3 We did not laugh yesterday. Yesterday we have not laughed.
  • VB4 She did not eat a banana a few hours ago. She has eaten a few minutes ago, no banana.

  • To make sense questioning puts you add the word "did" to the sentence. First, the word "did", the subject and the rest of the sentence. Note: After did / did not always follow the infinitive WITHOUT past-time output.
  • VB1 Did I listen to music last night? Last night I listened to music?
  • VB2 Did you walk to school last week? Are you walked to school last week?
  • VB3 Did we laugh yesterday? We have last laugh?
  • VB4 Did she eat a banana a few hours ago? She has a few minutes ago eaten a banana.

  • Past continuous

    You use a continuous fit if something was going on. It does not matter if no time is stipulated in the sentence or not. You make a continuous fit by a past form of the verb "to be" stuck followed by a verb with -ing to the stem.
  • VB1 I was listening to music. I was listening to music.
  • VB2 You were walking to school. You went to school walking.
  • VB3 We were laughing. We were laughing.
  • VB4 She was eating a banana. She was eating a banana.

  • To make the negative sentence, add the word "not" to the sentence. Was not = + was not. Were not = + were not.
  • EX1 I was not listening to music. I was not listening to music.
  • VB2 You were not walking to school. You were not at school walking.
  • VB3 We were not laughing. We were not laughing.
  • VB4 She was not eating a banana. She was not a banana eating.

  • To make sense asking you put in the form of "to be" at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the subject and the rest of the sentence.
  • VB1 Was I listening to music? I was listening to music?
  • VB2 Were you walking to school? Were you at school to walking?
  • VB3 Were we laughing? We were laughing?
  • VB4 Was she eating a banana? Was she a banana eating?

  • Future

    You use a future if something is about to happen. You make a future by adding the word "will" in a sentence. First the subject, the word "will" and the rest of the sentence. "Will" is followed by a very verb.
  • VB1 I will listen to music. I will listen to music.
  • VB2 You will walk to school. You will walk to school.
  • VB3 We will laugh. We will laugh.
  • VB4 She will eat a banana. They will eat a banana.

  • To make the negative sentence, add the word "not" to the sentence. + Will not = will not. Shall not = + Shall Not
  • VB1 I shall not listen to music. I will not listen to music.
  • VB2 You will not walk to school. You will not walk to school.
  • VB3 We shall not laugh. We will not laugh.
  • VB4 She will not eat a banana.

  • To make sense asking, slide "will" to the beginning of the sentence. It is followed by the subject, and then the rest of the sentence. In the 1st person singular and the first person plural do not you use the word in interrogative sentences "will", but "shall".
  • VB1 Shall I listen to music? I will listen to music?
  • VB2 Will you walk to school? Will you walk to school?
  • VB3 Shall we laugh? Should we laugh?
  • VB4 Will she eat a banana? They will eat a banana?

  • The past participle of 'bear' is 'borne' What a nice full article. And convenient!
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