The world and humanity of the Judeo-Christian culture

Miscellaneous LobsterNipples August 8, 2016 1 0
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This is an article about the world and the humanity of the Judeo-Christian culture. This refers to the views of the Judeo-Christian culture in the Middle Ages.

The Judeo-Christian culture

What kept the world in the Judeo-Christian culture?
  • The main characteristic of the Judeo-Christian worldview, God made the earth and the heavenly bodies created for the benefit of mankind. The earth is, as the home of man, the center of the universe.
  • Medieval scholars of antiquity tried the traditional knowledge of the Bible. Some scholars therefore rejected the sphericity of the earth and saw the earth as a flat disk. The most famous supporter of this vision was Isidore of Seville
  • The most medieval had world maps, as well as the Roman, the shape of a circle. On those cards Jerusalem was the center of the world. The Church had no need for a geographically correct worldview, but a symbolic world with Jerusalem as its centerpiece.

How changed the Christian worldview in the Middle Ages?
  • The ideas of Aristotle and Ptolemy on the universe were only rediscovered again ?? ?? by contacts with scholars from the Islamic world. The works of Ptolemy and Aristotle were translated in the 12th and 13th centuries from Arabic into Latin.
  • Only around 1350 was the idea that the earth was a sphere, among the scholars generally accepted.
  • New knowledge of the geography and landscape began between 1300 and 1350 to penetrate cards for practical use mainly sailors and traders.

What did the Judeo-Christian concept of man in?
The Judeo-Christian concept of man held in:
  • God created everything. His most important creature is man.
  • If man does what God requires of him, he will be rewarded for it forever. The man is not, as in the Greco-Roman humanity, depending on arbitrarily favors from the gods or natural forces.

What is characteristic of the man in the Judeo-Christian culture?
  • Man has free will, but punished if he does not adhere to God's will.
  • Man is imperfect but still has a chance to heaven.
  • Life on earth is a preparation for life after death.
  • Everyone is a full human being.
  • The marriage and the relationship between men and women were based on the teaching of the Church
  • The authority of the Church was obvious in many areas.

For each feature, one example or, if possible, more examples.

Man has free will, but punished if he does not adhere to God's will.
Examples:
  • The Christian Church man held for what the consequence of his choices would be: eternal reward in heaven or eternal punishment in hell.
  • In the late Middle Ages, the Church was led over to punish apostates during their lifetime. Courts of inquisition given the task to track down heretics.

Man is imperfect but still has a chance to heaven.
Examples:
  • Adam and Eve, the first humans, violated the commandments of God and since then wear all their descendant, the whole of humanity, the burden of God's anger. Jesus Christ, however, has reconciled humanity with God.
  • God imperfect humans permits in the sky when it was baptized and tried during his lifetime to live according to Jesus' example.

Life on earth is a preparation for life after death.
Example:
  • Clergy escorted the people at every stage of life to their final destination.

Everyone is a full human being.
Example:
  • In the late medieval society was a big disparity. But in the hereafter would at the Last Judgment all be judged equally

The marriage and the relationship between men and women were based on the teaching of the Church
Examples:
  • For Christianity, sexual abstinence and celibacy the highest state in which people could live. Those who could not afford it, should get married.
  • The Bible was deduced that the woman was subordinate.
  • The monogamous marriage ought to be just like the relationship between Christ and His bride, the Church.
  • The marriage was based on mutual love, not other interests such as family or business.

The authority of the Church was obvious in many areas.
Examples:
  • Education and science were in the hands of the clergy. The research areas and results of research were guarded by the Church
  • Artists were clergy or worked mostly in the service of the Church.
  • The most important medieval building styles, Romanesque and Gothic, were closely connected with the Church.
  • Churches were in the Middle Ages the most important buildings.
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