Truth On Repellents For Insects. What Are The Safe?

Health hawkeye64 August 8, 2016 0 0
FONT SIZE:
fontsize_dec
fontsize_inc

The season can still have fun outdoors, but the insect bites and the itching continue to be a problem. When insects are beginning to pinch, it is sometimes difficult to decide which option is worse: bear bites or expose yourself to chemicals contained in repellents? This is why the 'Environmental Working Group has just released a guide to choosing and using repellents considered safe.

Treat bites annoying is one thing, but when you live in an area where you are likely to get sick with viruses or diseases transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, is a completely different story: the researchers examined the scientific evidence exists regarding repellents and have reported what ingredients are safer and more effective, said Dr. David Andrews, senior scientist at the EWG and one of the study's researchers. While there is no way to avoid being bitten, some repellents work better than others, according to the report. Of course you still need to be careful how you use them, especially with children. The report lists four ingredients repellent that the Environmental Working Group considered relatively safe and include: Picaridin, the IR3535, oil of lemon, eucalyptus and its synthetic derivative PMD, finally dietiltoluamide.

Previous studies have indeed shown that DEET has harmful side effects and serious, such as potential neurological damage. In fact, the Environmental Working Group's report prompts people to use repellents based on DEET with caution, also explaining that, when used properly, DEET is actually safer than many other ingredients on the market. You think you can just work around the problem by using repellents to be fixed on the edge of the clothes? Do not be so sure: they may contain ingredients that are toxic to the skin, explains Dr. Andrews. Even they also represent a danger with the only inhalation, as in the case of the candles.

Get help with a few tips, before starting to spray repellent.

1. First try other methods

Now you know what ingredients sprays are safer, but that does not mean you can go to the pharmacy to stock up on insect repellent. The first step should be to not use them, choosing instead to take the necessary precautions, such as covering with long sleeves and pants and, with a fan to keep the air moving, says Andrews. Also, instead of lighting a candle repellent, consider creating a safety net around the area where you usually eat outside.

2. Double-check the packaging of repellent

Remember, just because the EWG said that these components are relatively safe, does not mean that any product that contains them is ok to use. we advise you to check the concentration of these active ingredients, too: once a concentration reaches a certain point, a top is probably the most effective and, indeed, will expose you to the chemical unnecessarily. "You should also make sure to follow the product instructions regarding the specific application of re-exposure," adds Dr. Andrews. "That's why it's smart to avoid dli hybrid repellent + sunscreens: the second must be applied more frequently and you will eventually go overboard with the repellent." It is also good to remember to wash your hands after application, so you do not accidentally ingest something.

3. Remember that not all are equal repellent

Andrews suggests, also referring to the guidance of the Environmental Working Group, to find out which repellent is the best solution for a particular situation, for example: if you are heading towards an open space for a short period of time, best to use a spray different from what would you take with you traveling out of the country, or doing a camping holiday or spending time in the area where West Nile virus is prevalent. Remember that the guidelines are different for children and for women pregnant, so check each case separately in your family.

Finally, an important recommendation: There are concerns about the repetitive use of ingredients "Recommended", specifies Dr. Andrews, then talk to your doctor if you think you have to use a repellent on a regular basis.

(0)
(0)