What is the distribution of the CITO test scores?

Education Owainnub August 8, 2016 1 0
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Every year around 150,000 students from Group 8 of the CITO test off. They can then get a score between 501 and 550. But what is the average score? And how many of the students get the maximum score of 550? How the scores are further divided? How should these scores be interpreted?

Classification Article

  • What is the average score on the CITO test?
  • How many children get the maximum score of 550?
  • How the scores are further divided?
  • What is the correct interpretation of these scores?

What is the average score on the CITO test?

STAT determines the standards in such a way that the average score is always equal to about 535, as can be seen in the table below. CITO is doing this so that the scores of this year are as similar as possible to the scores of previous vintages. In other words, it should not depend on the casual difficulty or simplicity of a CITO test scores that students get. Made remarkably few mistakes, then that is an indication that the CITO test is easy. The standards will be adjusted accordingly.

How many children get the maximum score of 550?

In 2015 7.800 pupils have achieved the maximum score of 550. This is equivalent to 4.70% of all students who took the final test. In 2014 this percentage was 5.13% and 5.06% in 2013. In 2012 and earlier this percentage was considerably lower at 2.87% in 2012 and 2.99% in 2011.
To get a score of 550 is however not necessary to make the flawless CITO test. It will depend on the standards, and so every year different, how many mistakes a student can make to get a score of 550 on the CITO test. In 2014 was with 181 or more correct answers a score of 550 can be achieved. In previous years this number was higher: 182 in 2013 and 185 in 2012.

How the scores are further divided?

Below you'll find three histograms the distribution of scores respectively in 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011 show. The distribution of d individual results for 2015 is similar to that of 2013-4.
2014
2013
2012
2011
2014
As shown in the figure for 2014 was 550 in that year, the most common score. The average score was 535 down by 3.95% of the children. 51.73% scored above average; 44.32% scored below average.
2013
As shown in the figure for 2013 was 550 in that year, the most common score. The average score was 535 down by 2.57% of the children. 52.34% scored above average; 45.09% scored below average.
2012
As shown in the figure for 2012 was 541 in that year, the most common score. The average score was 535 down by 3.91% of the children. 54.72% scored above average; 41.37% scored below average.
2011
As shown in the figure for 2011 was 540 in that year, the most common score. The average score was 535 down by 3.95% of the children. 54.31% scored above average; 41.74% scored below average.
Tabular see this every year as follows. The first table shows the scores for 2014, and the table below the scores for 2011, 2012 and 2013. The column 'percentage' shows the percentage of children received the relevant score. The column 'cumulative' shows the percentage of children got on the score or a lower score.
Score Table for 2014
Scoring table for previous years: 2013, 2012 and 2011

What is the correct interpretation of these scores?

CITO, the organization that makes the final test, the scores on the posttest links to a recommendation for the type of school that fits the child. Or, as CITO formulates cautiously, it recommends a type of school in which a student judging from the CITO test score "is overestimated nor underestimated." CITO above uses this table:
For example, a student who achieves a score of 540, seems "neither overestimated nor underestimated," to be when he / she is advised to go to highschool. However, as rightly CITO itself, this score is only a rule of thumb, not a straitjacket. In other words, other factors also play a role, making a student a higher or a lower school advice should get you on the basis of the CITO test score seems only appropriate.
A CITO test, of course, like any key, a snapshot and should therefore be interpreted with caution; some children develop faster or slower than others. The CITO test is also no IQ test, though there is some relationship between the two.
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